ladytauriellss:

Stop motion is a technique to make a physically manipulated object appear to move on its own. The object is moved in small increments between individually photographed frames, creating the illusion of movement when the series of frames is played as a continuous sequence. Dolls with movable joints or clay figures are often used in stop motion for their ease of repositioning. Stop motion animation using plasticine is called clay animation or “clay-mation”.
ladytauriellss:

Stop motion is a technique to make a physically manipulated object appear to move on its own. The object is moved in small increments between individually photographed frames, creating the illusion of movement when the series of frames is played as a continuous sequence. Dolls with movable joints or clay figures are often used in stop motion for their ease of repositioning. Stop motion animation using plasticine is called clay animation or “clay-mation”.
ladytauriellss:

Stop motion is a technique to make a physically manipulated object appear to move on its own. The object is moved in small increments between individually photographed frames, creating the illusion of movement when the series of frames is played as a continuous sequence. Dolls with movable joints or clay figures are often used in stop motion for their ease of repositioning. Stop motion animation using plasticine is called clay animation or “clay-mation”.
ladytauriellss:

Stop motion is a technique to make a physically manipulated object appear to move on its own. The object is moved in small increments between individually photographed frames, creating the illusion of movement when the series of frames is played as a continuous sequence. Dolls with movable joints or clay figures are often used in stop motion for their ease of repositioning. Stop motion animation using plasticine is called clay animation or “clay-mation”.
ladytauriellss:

Stop motion is a technique to make a physically manipulated object appear to move on its own. The object is moved in small increments between individually photographed frames, creating the illusion of movement when the series of frames is played as a continuous sequence. Dolls with movable joints or clay figures are often used in stop motion for their ease of repositioning. Stop motion animation using plasticine is called clay animation or “clay-mation”.
ladytauriellss:

Stop motion is a technique to make a physically manipulated object appear to move on its own. The object is moved in small increments between individually photographed frames, creating the illusion of movement when the series of frames is played as a continuous sequence. Dolls with movable joints or clay figures are often used in stop motion for their ease of repositioning. Stop motion animation using plasticine is called clay animation or “clay-mation”.
ladytauriellss:

Stop motion is a technique to make a physically manipulated object appear to move on its own. The object is moved in small increments between individually photographed frames, creating the illusion of movement when the series of frames is played as a continuous sequence. Dolls with movable joints or clay figures are often used in stop motion for their ease of repositioning. Stop motion animation using plasticine is called clay animation or “clay-mation”.
ladytauriellss:

Stop motion is a technique to make a physically manipulated object appear to move on its own. The object is moved in small increments between individually photographed frames, creating the illusion of movement when the series of frames is played as a continuous sequence. Dolls with movable joints or clay figures are often used in stop motion for their ease of repositioning. Stop motion animation using plasticine is called clay animation or “clay-mation”.

ladytauriellss:

Stop motion is a technique to make a physically manipulated object appear to move on its own. The object is moved in small increments between individually photographed frames, creating the illusion of movement when the series of frames is played as a continuous sequence. Dolls with movable joints or clay figures are often used in stop motion for their ease of repositioning. Stop motion animation using plasticine is called clay animation or “clay-mation”.

(via breakfastwife)

pixalry:

Pokemon Amigurumi - Created by Johnny Navarro
Available for sale at the artisan’s Etsy Shop. You can also follow on Tumblr and Facebook.
pixalry:

Pokemon Amigurumi - Created by Johnny Navarro
Available for sale at the artisan’s Etsy Shop. You can also follow on Tumblr and Facebook.
pixalry:

Pokemon Amigurumi - Created by Johnny Navarro
Available for sale at the artisan’s Etsy Shop. You can also follow on Tumblr and Facebook.
pixalry:

Pokemon Amigurumi - Created by Johnny Navarro
Available for sale at the artisan’s Etsy Shop. You can also follow on Tumblr and Facebook.

pixalry:

Pokemon Amigurumi - Created by Johnny Navarro

Available for sale at the artisan’s Etsy Shop. You can also follow on Tumblr and Facebook.

(via breakfastwife)

thefrogman:

Star Wars LEGO Photography by Vesa Lehtimäki [website | flickr]
[h/t: brain-food]
thefrogman:

Star Wars LEGO Photography by Vesa Lehtimäki [website | flickr]
[h/t: brain-food]
thefrogman:

Star Wars LEGO Photography by Vesa Lehtimäki [website | flickr]
[h/t: brain-food]
thefrogman:

Star Wars LEGO Photography by Vesa Lehtimäki [website | flickr]
[h/t: brain-food]
thefrogman:

Star Wars LEGO Photography by Vesa Lehtimäki [website | flickr]
[h/t: brain-food]
thefrogman:

Star Wars LEGO Photography by Vesa Lehtimäki [website | flickr]
[h/t: brain-food]
thefrogman:

Star Wars LEGO Photography by Vesa Lehtimäki [website | flickr]
[h/t: brain-food]
thefrogman:

Star Wars LEGO Photography by Vesa Lehtimäki [website | flickr]
[h/t: brain-food]
thefrogman:

Star Wars LEGO Photography by Vesa Lehtimäki [website | flickr]
[h/t: brain-food]
thefrogman:

Star Wars LEGO Photography by Vesa Lehtimäki [website | flickr]
[h/t: brain-food]

thefrogman:

Star Wars LEGO Photography by Vesa Lehtimäki [website | flickr]

[h/t: brain-food]

(via thelastinterceptor)

death-by-lulz:

jennaavh:
Oh I want a tree house! death-by-lulz:

jennaavh:
Oh I want a tree house! death-by-lulz:

jennaavh:
Oh I want a tree house! death-by-lulz:

jennaavh:
Oh I want a tree house! death-by-lulz:

jennaavh:
Oh I want a tree house! death-by-lulz:

jennaavh:
Oh I want a tree house! death-by-lulz:

jennaavh:
Oh I want a tree house! death-by-lulz:

jennaavh:
Oh I want a tree house! death-by-lulz:

jennaavh:
Oh I want a tree house! death-by-lulz:

jennaavh:
Oh I want a tree house!

Otherworldly Light Installations by Adela Andea

Otherworldly Light Installations by Adela Andea

Otherworldly Light Installations by Adela Andea

Otherworldly Light Installations by Adela Andea

Otherworldly Light Installations by Adela Andea

Otherworldly Light Installations by Adela Andea

Otherworldly Light Installations by Adela Andea

archiemcphee:

These beautiful pen-and-ink drawings by Japanese artist Manabu Ikeda are awesome in both scale and detail. The level of detail is so great that Mr. Ikeda spends up to two years creating just one of his pieces.

Manabu Ikeda begins work on his monumental artworks by sketching some images in his sketchbook as they pop into his head. He is always thinking about his art and sometimes sees images when he is doing the most mundane things, like having dinner with his friends. His drawing are a combination of the things that inspire him, from nature and history to technological advancements and catastrophic events like earthquakes or tsunamis. Although he has an idea of what he wants to lay down on paper when he starts to draw, a lot of time he just uses the images that flash in his mind as he is working, and the end result is a big mystery until the final stages of the drawing process. Filling a white canvas big enough to cover a large wall is a painstaking task, as Ikeda works at a very slow pace. His works are so insanely detailed that he will sometimes work for eight hours a day on a single 4-inch square trying to get everything just right.

Visit Oddity Central to view more of Manabu Ikeda’s epic artwork.
archiemcphee:

These beautiful pen-and-ink drawings by Japanese artist Manabu Ikeda are awesome in both scale and detail. The level of detail is so great that Mr. Ikeda spends up to two years creating just one of his pieces.

Manabu Ikeda begins work on his monumental artworks by sketching some images in his sketchbook as they pop into his head. He is always thinking about his art and sometimes sees images when he is doing the most mundane things, like having dinner with his friends. His drawing are a combination of the things that inspire him, from nature and history to technological advancements and catastrophic events like earthquakes or tsunamis. Although he has an idea of what he wants to lay down on paper when he starts to draw, a lot of time he just uses the images that flash in his mind as he is working, and the end result is a big mystery until the final stages of the drawing process. Filling a white canvas big enough to cover a large wall is a painstaking task, as Ikeda works at a very slow pace. His works are so insanely detailed that he will sometimes work for eight hours a day on a single 4-inch square trying to get everything just right.

Visit Oddity Central to view more of Manabu Ikeda’s epic artwork.
archiemcphee:

These beautiful pen-and-ink drawings by Japanese artist Manabu Ikeda are awesome in both scale and detail. The level of detail is so great that Mr. Ikeda spends up to two years creating just one of his pieces.

Manabu Ikeda begins work on his monumental artworks by sketching some images in his sketchbook as they pop into his head. He is always thinking about his art and sometimes sees images when he is doing the most mundane things, like having dinner with his friends. His drawing are a combination of the things that inspire him, from nature and history to technological advancements and catastrophic events like earthquakes or tsunamis. Although he has an idea of what he wants to lay down on paper when he starts to draw, a lot of time he just uses the images that flash in his mind as he is working, and the end result is a big mystery until the final stages of the drawing process. Filling a white canvas big enough to cover a large wall is a painstaking task, as Ikeda works at a very slow pace. His works are so insanely detailed that he will sometimes work for eight hours a day on a single 4-inch square trying to get everything just right.

Visit Oddity Central to view more of Manabu Ikeda’s epic artwork.
archiemcphee:

These beautiful pen-and-ink drawings by Japanese artist Manabu Ikeda are awesome in both scale and detail. The level of detail is so great that Mr. Ikeda spends up to two years creating just one of his pieces.

Manabu Ikeda begins work on his monumental artworks by sketching some images in his sketchbook as they pop into his head. He is always thinking about his art and sometimes sees images when he is doing the most mundane things, like having dinner with his friends. His drawing are a combination of the things that inspire him, from nature and history to technological advancements and catastrophic events like earthquakes or tsunamis. Although he has an idea of what he wants to lay down on paper when he starts to draw, a lot of time he just uses the images that flash in his mind as he is working, and the end result is a big mystery until the final stages of the drawing process. Filling a white canvas big enough to cover a large wall is a painstaking task, as Ikeda works at a very slow pace. His works are so insanely detailed that he will sometimes work for eight hours a day on a single 4-inch square trying to get everything just right.

Visit Oddity Central to view more of Manabu Ikeda’s epic artwork.
archiemcphee:

These beautiful pen-and-ink drawings by Japanese artist Manabu Ikeda are awesome in both scale and detail. The level of detail is so great that Mr. Ikeda spends up to two years creating just one of his pieces.

Manabu Ikeda begins work on his monumental artworks by sketching some images in his sketchbook as they pop into his head. He is always thinking about his art and sometimes sees images when he is doing the most mundane things, like having dinner with his friends. His drawing are a combination of the things that inspire him, from nature and history to technological advancements and catastrophic events like earthquakes or tsunamis. Although he has an idea of what he wants to lay down on paper when he starts to draw, a lot of time he just uses the images that flash in his mind as he is working, and the end result is a big mystery until the final stages of the drawing process. Filling a white canvas big enough to cover a large wall is a painstaking task, as Ikeda works at a very slow pace. His works are so insanely detailed that he will sometimes work for eight hours a day on a single 4-inch square trying to get everything just right.

Visit Oddity Central to view more of Manabu Ikeda’s epic artwork.

archiemcphee:

These beautiful pen-and-ink drawings by Japanese artist Manabu Ikeda are awesome in both scale and detail. The level of detail is so great that Mr. Ikeda spends up to two years creating just one of his pieces.

Manabu Ikeda begins work on his monumental artworks by sketching some images in his sketchbook as they pop into his head. He is always thinking about his art and sometimes sees images when he is doing the most mundane things, like having dinner with his friends. His drawing are a combination of the things that inspire him, from nature and history to technological advancements and catastrophic events like earthquakes or tsunamis. Although he has an idea of what he wants to lay down on paper when he starts to draw, a lot of time he just uses the images that flash in his mind as he is working, and the end result is a big mystery until the final stages of the drawing process. Filling a white canvas big enough to cover a large wall is a painstaking task, as Ikeda works at a very slow pace. His works are so insanely detailed that he will sometimes work for eight hours a day on a single 4-inch square trying to get everything just right.

Visit Oddity Central to view more of Manabu Ikeda’s epic artwork.

(via lulubonanza)

dfw-cub:

terra-mater:

15 amazing things in nature you won’t believe actually exist
Source

I am gonna make it my personal mission to see these places some day.
dfw-cub:

terra-mater:

15 amazing things in nature you won’t believe actually exist
Source

I am gonna make it my personal mission to see these places some day.
dfw-cub:

terra-mater:

15 amazing things in nature you won’t believe actually exist
Source

I am gonna make it my personal mission to see these places some day.
dfw-cub:

terra-mater:

15 amazing things in nature you won’t believe actually exist
Source

I am gonna make it my personal mission to see these places some day.
dfw-cub:

terra-mater:

15 amazing things in nature you won’t believe actually exist
Source

I am gonna make it my personal mission to see these places some day.
dfw-cub:

terra-mater:

15 amazing things in nature you won’t believe actually exist
Source

I am gonna make it my personal mission to see these places some day.
dfw-cub:

terra-mater:

15 amazing things in nature you won’t believe actually exist
Source

I am gonna make it my personal mission to see these places some day.
dfw-cub:

terra-mater:

15 amazing things in nature you won’t believe actually exist
Source

I am gonna make it my personal mission to see these places some day.

dfw-cub:

terra-mater:

15 amazing things in nature you won’t believe actually exist

Source

I am gonna make it my personal mission to see these places some day.

(via imagineriacaleidoscopica)